James & the Giant Peach. Q.

INFO: Dahl, Roald. James & the Giant Peach. Q. 1961.

DESC: James, orphaned by an enormous angry rhino, has to live with his terrible aunts Spiker and Sponge—until he accidentally drops magical glowing seeds at the roots of an old, dead peach tree.  When the magic causes the tree to grow one giant peach, James escapes his old life with the motley crew of giant bugs who live inside. Lots of kiddos have seen the movie; current school edition has tied-in illustrations. Chapters are 2-3 pages long.

TAGS: movie, adventure, chapter, bugs, magic, fantasy, weird names, weird bugs, Q, fiction, finland elementary, classics

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James & the Giant Peach. Q.

INFO: Dahl, Roald. James & the Giant Peach. Q. 1961.

DESC: James, orphaned by an enormous angry rhino, has to live with his terrible aunts Spiker and Sponge—until he accidentally drops magical glowing seeds at the roots of an old, dead peach tree.  When the magic causes the tree to grow one giant peach, James escapes his old life with the motley crew of giant bugs who live inside. Lots of kiddos have seen the movie; current school edition has tied-in illustrations. Chapters are 2-3 pages long.

TAGS: movie, adventure, chapter, bugs, magic, fantasy, weird names, weird bugs, Q, fiction, finland elementary, classics

The Velveteen Rabbit. Q.

INFO: Williams, Margery. The Velveteen Rabbit. Q. 1922/1975 (republished).

DESC: This children’s classic is a surprising sleeper hit in the “Q” section – it’s far more lush and complicated than it first appears. The sonorous, lilting language and gorgeous illustrations will give kiddos at this reading level something to delight in; and the complicated moral plotline (i.e. what do we do with old things) has incredibly rich connotations for writing, thinking and unpacking (what do we do about our elders? about waste? about discarded items? cultures of disposability?). Students will also find wonder in the “magical realism” that pervades the book – are there faeries? Did the Velveteen Rabbit really become “real”? This book has fascinated and charmed some of the most stubborn readers – something about the apparent antiquity of the pages (vs. the majority of the other bookroom books, written from the 60s to the 90s) really holds their curiosity. Well worth a read – and fairly fast, too!

TAGS: toys, rabbits, animals, magic, magical realism, classics, rabbits, fiction, growing up, earlier times, faeries, Q